Tuesday, July 3, 2007

Moral Development

When Karana is first left alone on the island, her moral ideology is more or less identical to that of her people. However, Karana develops her own moral code. The laws of Karana's tribe forbid women from making weapons, a fact that Karana struggles with constantly as she pits superstition against necessity. But she still made weapons for her survival need despite the facts. Indeed, she makes that spear almost as a hobby, for catching devilfish is not a necessity. Another way in which Karana departs from her tribe's rituals is through her friendship with Tutok. After the incident with Captain Orlov, the people of Ghalas-at become the sworn enemies of the Aleuts. Karana, however, gives Tutok a chance, even though she is an Aleut and potentially very dangerous. Eventually, Karana eve learns to trust someone she had formerly considered an enemy. A final way in which Karana divulges from the ideology of her people is. Hunting and killing animals was a necessary part of her tribe's economy, but Karana no longer wishes to kill animals because she sees them as very much like people. Karana admits that her friends and family would likely find her decision that animals are like people amusing, but she has come to it through her own experience sticks by it.

ideology-
1)The body of ideas reflecting the social needs and aspirations of an individual, group, class, or culture.
2)A set of doctrines or beliefs that form the basis of a political, economic, or other system.
http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/dolphins/themes.html

All created things have their degree or stage of maturity. The period of maturity in the life of a tree is the time of its fruit-bearing... The animal attains a state of full growth and completeness, and in the human kingdom man reaches his maturity when the light of his intelligence attains its greatest power and development... Similarly there are periods and stages in the collective life of humanity. At one time it was passing through its stage of childhood, at another its period of youth, but now it has entered its long-predicted phase of maturity, the evidences of which are everywhere apparent... That which was applicable to human needs during the early history of the race can neither meet nor satisfy the demands of this day, this period of newness and consummation. Humanity has emerged from its former state of limitation and preliminary training. Man must now become imbued with new virtues and powers, new moral standards, new capacities. New bounties, perfect bestowals, are awaiting and already descending upon him. The gifts and blessings of the period of youth, although timely and sufficient during the adolescence of mankind, are now incapable of meeting the requirements of its maturity.
http://info.bahai.org/article-1-8-0-2.html

Traditionally, psychology has avoided studying anything that is loaded with value judgements. There is a degree of difficulty involved in trying to be unbiased about things that involve terms like "good" and "bad!" So, one of the most significant aspects of human life -- morality -- has had to wait quite a while before anyone in psychology dared to touch it! But Lawrence Kohlberg wanted to study morality, and did so using some of the most interesting (if controversial) techniques. Basically, he would ask children and adults to try to solve moral dilemmas contained in little stories, and to do so outloud so he could follow their reasoning. It wasn't the specific answers to the dilemmas that interested him, but rather how the person got to his or her answer.
One of the most famous of these stories concerned a man named Heinz. His wife was dying of a disease that could be cured if he could get a certain medicine. When he asked the pharmacist, he was told that he could get the medicine, but only at a very high price -- one that Heinz could not possibly afford. So the next evening, Heinz broke into the pharmacy and stole the drug to save his wife's life. Was Heinz right or wrong to steal the drug?
http://webspace.ship.edu/cgboer/genpsymoraldev.html

summary
Even though Karana is left in the island alone, not knowing if she has to make weapons for her protection needs and survival, it's the superstition against necessity. But she till made it. Hunting and killing animals was a necessary part of her tribe's economy but she did not kill them anymore though she need them for food. That which was applicable to human needs during the early history of the race can neither meet nor satisfy the demands of this day, this period of newness and consummation. Karana even gave the Aluet her real name even though the Ghalas has become the sworn enemies of the Aleuts. This shows that she has shown trust in the Aluet even though they were sworn enemies. The gifts and blessings of the period of youth, although timely and sufficient during the adolescence of mankind, are now incapable of meeting the requirements of its maturity.
a man named Heinz whose wife was dying of a disease that could be cured if he could get a certain medicine. When he asked the pharmacist, he was told that he could get the medicine, but only at a very high price -- one that Heinz could not possibly afford. So the next evening, Heinz broke into the pharmacy and stole the drug to save his wife's life. Was Heinz right or wrong to steal the drug?
This shows how much love he has for his wife.
Karana too has much love for the animals, her brother and has also decieded to give the Aluet another chance.

1 Comment:

jasmine piong said...

You should not copy the whole story.You should write a summary about that particular chapter. :)